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Part 1: Digital Citizenship Education… Over 20 Essential Resources

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Welcome to a series that examines the importance of facilitating digital citizenship with today’s students. First, to ensure you do not miss one of these valuable posts or other resources covering PBL, Digital Curriculum, Web 2.0, STEM, 21st century learning, and technology integration, please sign up for 21centuryedtech by email or RSS.  As always,  I invite you to follow me on twitter (@mjgormans). Please give this post a retweet and pass it on. Have a great week – Michael Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Booking Info – Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Please contact me soon if you have an interest. It is not to early to think about planning PD for the next school year …. dates are  already beginning to fill!

Part 1: Digital Citizenship Education… Over 20 Essential Resources  (http://21centuryedtech.wordpress.com/)

In the last year I have been working toward building up our district e-curriculum. With this emphasis comes the need to also provide classroom educators and students with resources regarding proper learning and citizenship on the internet. I believe this is essential to the success of any e-learning, blended learning, and on-line learning program. In the next few post I wish to not only share resources, but also information I have either created or found in assisting teachers and students in promoting an e-learning environment that promotes learning, academics, safety, and 21st century learning. Don’t miss an upcoming post… sign up today and please give this post a retweet. It will definitely help you Professional Learning Community. Enjoy the start of these resources and look for ten more in the next post.

Common Sense Media Student Video Library
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/video/educators
The Common Sense Media Student Video Library has more than 20 videos that are each 2-4 minutes long. Use them in conjunction with their corresponding lesson plans, or use them to jump start a conversation with your students

Digital Citizenship Classroom Posters
 http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/posters
Download these from Common Sense Media colorful POSTERS to remind your students about digital citizenship and device care and maintenance. These posters could be the perfect addition to any classroom.

Digital Citizenship Scope and Sequence
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/scope-and-sequence
Use Common Sense Media’s Scope & Sequence tool to find the lessons that are just right for your classroom. These cross-curricular units spiral to address digital literacy and citizenship topics in an age-appropriate way. Browse by grade band or click a category to highlight the lessons that address that topic. You can download a PDF of the Scope and Sequence (en español).

Free Cyber-bullying Tool Kits For all levels of teachers
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/cyberbullying-toolkit 
Click link for what you might need: Elementary…Middle School…High School 
Every day, you see how Cyber-bullying hurts students, disrupts classrooms, and impacts your school’s culture. So how should you handle it? What are the right things to do and say? What can you do today that will help your students avoid this pitfall of our digital world? Common Sense Media has created these free toolkit to help you take on those questions and take an effective stand against Cyber-bullying. So start here. Use it now. Rely on it to start your year off right.

PBS Webonauts Academy
http://pbskids.org/webonauts/about/ 
Webonauts Internet Academy is a web original game for PBS KIDS GO! that gives kids 8- to 10-year-old an opportunity to have some fun while exploring what it means to be a citizen in a web-infused‚ information-rich world. It is an engaging experience on its own but becomes all the more powerful when parents and teachers use game play as a springboard for conversations about media literacy and citizenship in the 21st Century.

Netsmartz Teens
http://www.nsteens.org/
NSTeens.org was created through a partnership between Sprint® and the Internet safety experts at NetSmartz® Workshop, a program of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®. Through animated videos, short films, games, and interactive comics, NSTeens teaches tweens and teens about making safer choices online. Teaching materials are available for intermediate, middle school, and high school educators so they can bring these engaging lessons right into the classroom. All resources on NSTeens.org are available free of charge. Check out the how to use page…. http://www.nsteens.org/Educators 

Netzsmarts Workshop
http://www.netsmartz.org
Check out the workshop page where you will find material for different groups. NetSmartz Workshop is an interactive, educational program that provides age-appropriate resources to help teach children how to be safer on- and offline. The program is designed for children ages 5-17, parents and guardians, and educators. With resources such as videos, games, activity cards, and presentations, NetSmartz entertains while it educates.

Ikeepsafe
http://www.ikeepsafe.org/educators/
Here you will find a goldmine of wonderful resources with some great suggestions for working with kids of all ages. Examples:

  •  Fauxpaw for Early Elementary - http://www.ikeepsafe.org/educators/fauxpaw/ - This is an engaging program that any young student will enjoy and learn from.
  • ·Privacy and Reputation Online - http://www.ikeepsafe.org/educators/more/project-pro/ - Great idea starter and also be sure to take a look at the guide which contains lesson plans - http://goo.gl/DoZmmg
  •  Google Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum - http://www.ikeepsafe.org/educators/more/google/  This curriculum is designed to be interactive, discussion filled and allow students to learn through hands-on and scenario activities. Each workshop contains a resource booklet for both educators and students that can be downloaded in PDF form, presentations to accompany the lesson and animated videos to help frame the conversation.


Digital Education Revolution
http://www.digitalcitizenship.nsw.edu.au/index.htm 
This Australian Website asks the question, Do you use the internet to share information about yourself or others, communicate with friends, comment on what you see online, play games, get material for an assignment or buy stuff online? If you answered YES to any of these, you are a digital citizen. Why is digital citizenship important?  Do you want to get the best out of using the internet and keep yourself and others safe and healthy in an online world? Use these materials to learn what it takes to become a positive digital citizen

Media Education Lab
http://mediaeducationlab.com/curriculum/materials
The Media Education Lab from the University of Rhode Island is one of the leading providers of multimedia curriculum resources for K-12 media literacy education. Take advantage of our extensive collection of free resources. You will be amazed at tall of the digital and media education possibilities.

Thanks for joining me on this wonderful journey of 21st century digital citizenship resources and be ready for ten more resources next.  Join me in future weeks as together we continue to explore several more posts devoted to the Flipped Classrooms, Project Based Learning, Assessing 21st century skills, technology integration, web resources, and digital literacy.  I enjoy learning from all of you. Also remember to subscribe to this blog by RSS or email and follow me on twitter at mjgormans.  I also appreciate your sharing of this post and any retweets. Keep  up the amazing work,  have a great week, and enjoy the resources! – Mike Gorman

Booking Info - Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Those 2014 dates are going fast.

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Project Based and Authentic Learning… Plus Ten Valuable PBL Resource Links

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Welcome to a very special post that emphasizes authentic learning in the classroom. It is also filled with some amazing resources that will help you put some real in learning that will engage students. This is a guest post written by a very good friend of mine, Dayna Laur, who is a fellow National Faculty at the BUCK Institute (BIE).  I also encourage you to take a look at her book,  Authentic Learning Experiences: A Real-World Approach to Project Based Learning  , which will give you some ideas of bringing authentic learning in the classroom. First, please take a moment to subscribe to this blog by RSS or email and  join me on twitter at mjgormans .   Sign up and retweet…  and have a wonderful week! – Mike Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Booking Info – Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Please contact me soon if you have an interest. It is not to early to think about planning PD for the next school year …. dates are  already beginning to fill!

Project Based and Authentic Learning… (Dayna Laur – @daylynn)  

As winter is finally winding down and I’m beginning to hear the birds chirping in the morning, I am conflicted with a sense of renewal and a sense of dread. The month of March signals the beginning of our state standardized tests here in Pennsylvania. Right on cue, the talk at home, for my fourth grade daughter, has shifted from how much she doesn’t particularly like school to how she must perform well on the PSSAs (Pennsylvania System of School Assessment). As a veteran public school teacher of fourteen years, it isn’t what I want to hear. I’ve, unfortunately, become accustomed to incessant worksheets that are stuffed into her backpack and take hours to complete during the evening. I’ve become almost immune to the endless writing of spelling words, in different colors, to fashion a variety of shapes. However, the near fear that has been placed in her to perform well on the standardized test, that takes place in two weeks, has pushed me to my limit. I long for a day when my daughter comes home, excited about the challenges she’s been tasked to solve, while at school. Alas, I don’t foresee this happening during her fourth grade year.

While I could debate the merits of standardized testing, I realize I’d be wasting my breath. Standardized testing isn’t going away in the foreseeable future. However, it is time that we begin developing our classroom to both empower our students and prepare them with the ability to think deeply and critically about significant content. Once this happens, the performance on the standardized tests will naturally increase as well.

In an effort to move away from mere rote memorization and standardized test preparation and toward increasing 21st century skills, many teachers have been embracing project-based learning in their classrooms. My good friend and colleague, Mike Gorman, has written many great posts about PBL on this blog. However, as Mike and I know all too well, many teachers use the framework of PBL to simply default back to having students create a research paper in a fancier format. Think about it. How many iMovie documentaries or Prezi presentations are completed by students, but in the end, don’t actually solve a problem? Moving away from these types of projects and toward designing Authentic Learning Experiencesfor our students will empower a generation of students who are producers of new information, rather than simply consumers of already known information.

To begin designing your own authentic learning experience for your students, just take a look around your school or community. What issues do you see or, better yet, what issues do your students see? This becomes your challenging investigation. While similar to the driving question in PBL, the challenging investigation, however, needs to be an actionable event that is linked to a community or career connection. Think, “How can we design…?” or “How can we decrease…?” For inspiration, take a look at this example of how disinterested students were empowered to rebuild their community. You can also check out this example of students using math, engineering, and even principles of art to invent, market, and sell an amazing new product.

As students become invested in completing the challenging investigation, it is necessary for them to analyze data, research opposing viewpoints, and collaborate with experts in the field in order to provide justification for their solution to the challenging investigation. Thus, math and statistics become a very real component of the authentic learning experience, in addition to a deep inquiry through the research and design process. TuvaLabs is a perfect online repository for building data literacy skills while empowering students to connect to local and global issues. ProCon.org provides students with a non-partisan approach to many issues that may be designed into an authentic learning experience.

As students move through the challenging investigation and gather evidence to justify their solution, we can already see an increase in student attention and empowerment. However, stopping short of the next element of authentic learning experiences, an outside audience, frequently occurs. In order to truly empower students to be change agents, problem solvers, designers, or contributors to their community, it is necessary to incorporate this component. Students need to know that they have a voice and have the ability to make a difference. The outside audience gives students this voice. Although, it is necessary to ensure that the outside audience is also an authentic audience. A roomful of parents may be a nice way to show off what students have learned, but rarely do parents connect to the presentation of learning as experts in the field. Thus, it is important to make a direct correlation with the end product and the audience for whom it is intended. Pitching an idea to the town council, writing and proposing legislation to a state representative, designing, building, and installing a structure are all ways in which an outside audience can come to life. Through this process, students are able to see their work become actualized or their ideas given meaning.

If you would like to read more about how to create authentic learning experiences for your students, you will find a more detailed description in my book, Authentic Learning Experiences: A Real-World Approach to Project Based Learning. It includes many examples, from all content areas and across all grade levels, which have been implemented by teachers from all over the country. There are also detailed descriptions of how technology was infused in each of the projects and ideas for generating your own authentic learning experiences. Many thanks to Mike, for asking me to be a guest blogger! Please check out these links below that will help you turn up real authentic learning. While tehy are not PBL projects, they just might open the door to a project that will bring real learning to your classroom.

…. Plus Ten Valuable PBL Resource Links
  • Kids are Heroes: http://www.kidsareheroes.org/ - This organization shares humanitarian efforts of hundreds of kids from all over the world who are actively making this a better planet. Children are empowered to become compassionate leaders by engaging  in youth volunteerism.  You will discover kids drilling water wells in Africa, helping orphans in India and building homes in Haiti, recycling and cleaning up their neighborhoods, helping their local animal shelters and making life better for their neighbors.
  • Kids Making a Difference: http://kmad.org/ -   Discover this non-profit organization formed by a group of youth volunteer animal enthusiasts, dedicated to the advancement of animal welfare. It has a mission, in partnership with committed adult volunteers,  to cultivate involved youth to their full potential, developing qualities of leadership, values, and social and environmental conscience while advancing animal welfare.
  • Kids Can Make A Difference: http://www.kidscanmakeadifference.org/ -  This is a program of iEARN (International Education and Resource Network). This is  the world’s largest non-profit global network that enables teachers and youth to use the Internet and other technologies to collaborate on projects that enhance learning and make a difference in our world.
  • One World Education: http://www.oneworldeducation.org/ - It is time to discover this initiate that provides middle and high school Common Core literacy programs in a real world way.  It allows students to  publish essays on cultural and global issues, which promotes peer-to-peer learning, and builds college and career writing skills.
  • Real World Design Challenge: http://www.realworlddesignchallenge.org/ - The Real World Design Challenge (RWDC) is an annual competition that provides high school students the opportunity to work on real world engineering challenges in a team environment. Each year, student teams will be asked to address a challenge that confronts our nation’s leading industries.
  • Global School Net: http://www.globalschoolnet.org/index.cfm - This organization supports 21st century, brain-friendly learning, and improves academic performance through content-driven collaboration. They engage educators and students in brain-friendly e-learning projects worldwide to develop science, math, literacy and communication skills, foster teamwork, civic responsibility and collaboration, encourage workforce preparedness and create multi-cultural understanding. It is their goal to prepare youth for full participation as productive and compassionate citizens in an increasing global economy.
  • Fantasy SCOTUS: http://www.fantasyscotus.net/ - Take a look at the  Internet’s Premier Supreme Court Fantasy League. In its fifth season, over 20,000 attorneys, law students, and other avid Supreme Court followers made predictions about all cases that the Supreme Court decided.
  • Fact Check: http://www.factcheck.org - Brought to you by the Annenberg Public Policy Center, a nonpartisan, nonprofit “consumer advocate” for voters. Its goal is to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics. They monitor the factual accuracy of what is said by major U.S. political players in the form of TV ads, debates, speeches, interviews and news releases. It’s  goal is to apply the best practices of both journalism and scholarship, and to increase public knowledge and understanding.
  • Innocentive: https://www.innocentive.com/ - InnoCentive is the global leader in crowdsourcing innovation problems to the world’s smartest people. In turn they compete to provide ideas and solutions to important business, social, policy, scientific, and technical challenges. Some high level problem solving involved.
  • Project Breaker: http://www.projectbreaker.org/ - Breaker’s mission is to drive social innovation and alternative learning by mobilizing interdisciplinary teams of young creative collaborators to help solve the world’s most pressing problems. They connect young people with global thought leaders and industry experts to answer challenges like literacy, urban agriculture, and technology for civic engagement.
Thanks for joining myself and Dayna Laur in a post that I believe can bring some real learning to any classroom. You also may check out a little more authenticity and PBL by reading Dayna’s book, Authentic Learning Experiences: A Real-World Approach to Project Based Learning.  In the coming weeks you will discover posts devoted to 21st century education including such topics as Flipped Classrooms, Project Based Learning, Assessing 21st century skills, technology integration, web resources, and digital literacy.  I enjoy learning from all of you. Also, remember to subscribe to this 21centuryedtech  Blog by RSS or email and follow me on twitter at mjgormans. I also appreciate your sharing of this post and any retweets.  Have a great week! – Mike Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Booking Info - Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Those 2014 dates are going fast.

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Two Free Webinar… Amazing STEM Resources…. And … Investigating PBL

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I invite you to join me this week at two free Webinars. One will be emphasize STEM resources while the other take you on a journey in Project Based Learning.  First, please take a moment to subscribe to this blog by RSS or email and  join me on twitter at mjgormans .  I am so excited to share with you some wonderful resources and some truly amazing people this week at these webinars. Have a wonderful week and I hope to see you at the events! – Mike Gorman (21centuryedtech)

  • Webinar Number One
  • Connect & Collaborate… Meet & Learn from STEM Educators
  • Webinar - Monday, March 24, 2014 at 7:00pm EDT For Educators
  • Click Here To Register

Join me, and several guests, in this high-energy STEM-focused professional development event from the Siemens STEM Academy at Discovery Education.  I’ll  be sharing resources you won’t want to miss. You will see examples of how you can integrate more  activities and lessons into your classroom?  I will also connect you to like-minded educators Chris Lazartic, Maureen Barrett, and Tim Kubinak whom have entire STEM-focused units ready to share. You will also be introduced to some amazing tools and resources as we explore the Siemens STEM Academy. No matter where you are on you STEM journey, connect with all of us on Monday the 24th so that we can share real-world, practical examples of projects and lessons that you can utilize in your classroom the next day.

  • Webinar Number Two
  • Microsoft and ISTE Partners In Education Series… Project Based Learning
  • Webinar - Wednesday, March 26, 2014 at 8:00pm EDT For Educators
  • Click Here To Register

Join me as I moderate this webinar that will introduce you to PBL resources and people that you will enjoy learning about. The Driving Question examines, “How do we connect the dots for students as they develop their 21st Century Skills?” Project Based Learning is one of the most effective ways to do so.  I am really excited having the chance to introduce you to some wonderful educators. Also joining me will be a fellow BIE National Faculty Member, Suzie Boss. You may know her from some of her wonderful books on PBL, or insightful writings at Edutopia. Please take a moment to to join me,  and let’s learn together!

I hope to see you at this weeks free webinars.  In the coming weeks you will  also discover posts devoted to 21st century education including such topics as Flipped Classrooms, Project Based Learning, Assessing 21st century skills, technology integration, web resources, and digital literacy.  I enjoy learning from all of you. Also, remember to subscribe to this 21centuryedtech  Blog by RSS or email and follow me on twitter at mjgormans. I also appreciate your sharing of this post and any retweets.   Have a great week! – Mike Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Booking Info – Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Please contact me soon if you have an interest. It is not to early to think about planning PD for the next school year …. dates are  already beginning to fill!

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Part 2… 30 NCAA Basketball Lesson Plan Resources and Links … A PBL Series

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Welcome to a second post containing 15 more   amazing links to use during the NCAA Basket Ball Tournament. First, please take a moment to subscribe to this blog by RSS or email and  join me on twitter at mjgormans .  You see… we really must learn to put into practice some of the best lessons never taught! Sign up and retweet… the next 15 links will be out soon. Have an exciting tournament and a wonderful week! – Mike Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Booking Info – Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Please contact me soon if you have an interest. It is not to early to think about planning PD for the next school year …. dates are  already beginning to fill!

In the last post I shared an almost PBL story that I hope you enjoyed. The post also contained 15 links to help bring the engagement and excitement of the NCAA tournament to your classroom. Did you miss it? I have the link here. When basketball can be integrated with content standards and 21st century education, everyone wins. Please stake a moment to enjoy these next 15 links. Also, please join me for an upcoming free STEM Webinar this coming Monday, March 24 at 7:00 PM at the Discovery Siemens STEM Academy. I have some great educators joining me as we share some wonderful STEM resources  on Monday, March 24, 2014 at 7:00 pm EDT. Take a moment and Register  Here… and now on to those links!

What is a Slam Dunk? – The website Wonderapolis provides this interesting question, video, and related ideas. It could just be a slam dunk lesson!

Who Invented Basketball – You and your students can explore another wonder of the day from Wonderapolis. Students will enjoy the video, accompanying fact, and any activity incorporated with it.

The Harlem Globetrotters and Early Professional Basketball – Perhaps you can design a lesson from this podcast at the Smithsonian History Explorer. Student will discover how this group of amazing basketball players became the world’s most recognizable sports team

Math in Basketball – This is a wonderful learning interactive from PBS Learning Media. Students follow a profile of Elton Brand, an accomplished basketball player who uses math in his work, students are presented with this mathematical basketball challenge. This site does require free registration for educators.

Basketball by Dragon Fly TV – This is a wonderful lesson with video that asks the question, “Why do some shots go in… and others do not?” This could lead to a great engaging classroom experiment.

Robot Basketball – This lesson comes from Try Engineering.  It demonstrates the difference between precision and accuracy. Students design a device that can shoot a basketball free-throw shot accurately every time.

Engineer Hoopsters – A great article from eGFI that lets students know you can excel in the STEM fields while also playing basketball… and winning. A wonderful article that promotes both sports and academics.

Math Basketball Games – Are you looking for a way to bring a little basketball into your elementary of middle school math class? These games can be used in the classroom in connection with smart boards and Promethean boards.

Penny Basketball – A site that poses a lesson that involves penny basketball. Best of all, students learn how to make sense of the data they collect.

Energy Transfer – This is a great lesson in kinetic energy and energy transfer. It is also a wonderful time to use a basketball to display the laws of physics.

Math In Basketball – This is a fantastic lesson plan from Get the Math.  Using video segments and web interactives, students engage in an exploration of mathematics, specifically reasoning and sense making, to solve real world problems.  Best of all,  students focus on understanding the Big Ideas of Algebra: patterns, relationships, equivalence, and linearity.

Science of Hang Time – Can your students answer the question, “How High Can You Jump?” They can experience this great video for PE, Math or Physics as students learn about the science behind the hang time in basketball. Perhaps you can create an activity around this.

National Geographic for Kids – Students can discover this great article on why the NBA uses leather basketballs. It could be used to create some experiments and a fantastic STEM lesson.

Where Will it Go? – This is a lesson plan aimed at lower elementary allowing student prediction of where a ball will go when bounced. This is a perfect opportunity to use any ball… or perhaps a basketball?

Sports Science – This ESPN series has three video dedicated to basketball. It might be the basis for a great STEM lesson during this exciting basketball season.

So there are the rest of those NCAA links. Please follow and sign up.  If this has been useful please give a retweet! It means a lot! Also, please remember to  join me for that upcoming free STEM Webinar this coming Monday, March 24 at 7:00 PM at the Discovery Siemens STEM Academy. It is on Monday, March 24, 2014 at 7:00 pm EDT. Take a moment and Register  Here.

Thanks for joining me in my tribute to education and the need to include student voice, choice and relevance to learning. In the coming weeks you will discover posts devoted to 21st century education including such topics as Flipped Classrooms, Project Based Learning, Assessing 21st century skills, technology integration, web resources, and digital literacy.  I enjoy learning from all of you. Also, remember to subscribe to this 21centuryedtech  Blog by RSS or email and follow me on twitter at mjgormans. I also appreciate your sharing of this post and any retweets.  I hope you enjoy your journey of  best lessons never taught.  Have a great week! – Mike Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Booking Info - Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Those 2014 dates are going fast.

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30 NCAA Basketball Lesson Links … PBL Series… Best Classroom Lessons Never Taught

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Welcome to a  post with a mix of educational ideas pressing full court toward the NCAA Basketball Tournament. I bring to you a not only a two part series of posts containing 30 amazing links. I also wish to share an almost PBL story. After a short read I am sure you will understand my thoughts on student voice, choice and relevance.   It really is quite amazing the impact that the NCAA tournament has on students. Please let me share a story and dream about educational transformation. First, please take a moment to subscribe to this blog by RSS or email and  join me on twitter at mjgormans .  You see… we really must learn to put into practice some of the best lessons never taught! Sign up and retweet… the next 15 links will be out soon. Have an exciting tournament and a wonderful week! – Mike Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Booking Info – Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Please contact me soon if you have an interest. It is not to early to think about planning PD for the next school year …. dates are  already beginning to fill!

Welcome to my PBL Reflection… it really is a good read… but if you want the links right away… scroll down

It was twenty minutes before the first school bell would ring, signifying the beginning of another day of learning. Students were beginning to enter and fill the classroom.  There was air of extreme excitement as the teacher looked from nook to corner. It was a typical room filled with students, desks, chairs, and a few computers. This morning seemed to be different from the others. The teacher stood perplexed, in awe of an  amazing event that was beginning to unfold. Students were using computers and  printers to produce what appeared to be a complicated worksheet. Some kids were on the floor while others were seated at tables eagerly filling the paper out! Their eyes were filled with inquiry and enthusiasm as they completed the graphical sheet from top to bottom! It was definitely a worksheet experience like no other the teacher had ever witnessed! Upon closer inspection the teacher realized the students had searched for and found the new NCAA Basketball Brackets.

The teacher watched students engaged in a true spirit of collaboration and communication, as they learned from each other some interesting facts about each of the college teams. Geography was a main topic, as students discovered via Google Maps, the location of various universities. The teacher could hear students compare and contrast strengths and weakness of the various competitors, while others children used mathematics to perform some comparative scoring.  There was a massive research symposium, as students looked on the internet to find out what the experts of the newly founded science of “Bracketology” thought!  Some students came to the teacher ready to present their reasoning for their selections showcasing some powerful  persuasion skills. Any observer would have been amazed by the thought, creativity, and reflections that the students were able to share. It appeared that that the students were in control of this special learning experience. They had created their own lesson with an engagement based on their interest in the real world. It was much like watching a game of neighborhood baseball long before the advent of sanctioned  leagues and teams.

The twenty minutes were soon past as the bell  rang, and announced yet another day of learning. The Brackets Papers were put away, while the room came to a silent halt. Students left their collaborative groups and sat in their individual seats. They pulled out a worksheet, some only half filled out, assigned  from the day before. The teacher initiated a lecture entitled ” Making Predictions Using Compare and Contrast”. The students  appeared to listen as they took notes. After all this was an important standard to be repeated for a test. What a change the bell had made.  The March of Madness was over.  It was now a time to learn!

NCAA Basketball Links – The First 15 (Next 15 in a later post this week… sign up now and please retweet!

Live Interactive Bracket – Watch the NCAA live interactive bracket for this year’s tournament.  Note that this page also contains a printable bracket.

2013 NCAA Big Dance Basics – Take a look and get ideas from the STEM site eGFI. You will get hooked as your read their statement: “ From long-shot “Cinderella” teams to “field goal” averages, “giant killers” and “bracketology,” the NCAA Div. 1 men’s college basketball championship has generated a host of pet terms and traditions since it first tipped off in 1939”.

Basketball Physics – This lesson comes from Science Friday.  It contains the Driving Question, “ How does physics affect your game?” John Fontanella, a physicist at the U.S. Naval Academy and author of The Physics of Basketball, explains the role of physics in basketball, from foul shots to side-arm passes. You and your students will find out what forces are acting on the ball, and what players have to do to offset these forces.

Physics of Basketball – From the same author found above, watch this video that shows and explains some of the Physics involved in basketball.

Tennessee Sports Math Project – This page provides not just Math ideas but a complete interdisciplinary set of ideas to bring the NCAA tournament into any classroom.

Basketball For Better Verse – This lesson from Education World provide students the opportunity to look at various basketball poems and the publish their own.

The Team at Home – Another lesson from Education World that allows students to locate an NCAA basketball tournament team on a map, research the relationship of the team’s name and mascot to the history and geography of the college. This is a great social studies lesson.

Who’s Number 1? Investigating the Math of Rankings – In this amazing lesson, students explore the use of quantitative ratings by examining how Division I college basketball teams are ranked, and how specific mathematical decisions can and do have significant consequences.

March Madness… Reading for information Lesson Plan – This is brought to you by Bright Hub Education.  It contains a creative lesson plan that helps kids prepare for the reading proficiency test. It’s a great way to use the NCAA tournament to practice reading for information.

Thinking About The Future… A Poem of Possibilities –  This resource from Read Write Think  focuses on the poem “Ex-Basketball Player” by John Updike, analyzing the details and the format of the poem. From there students are then introduced to a writing assignment in which they write a poem about themselves in five years.

Bracket Science – Do you really want a fascinating reading about the science of the brackets? This is a great read and could be a part of any language arts or math class.

Basketball Jersey – This activity from the Smithsonian’s History Explorer examines Boston Celtics, Bob Cousy jersey…  using both the artifact at the museum and the image. What stories might one jersey tell?

James Naismith… Inventor of the Game of Basketball – This is another awesome activity from Read Write Think. Students look at the original rules of basketball, allowing a perfect opportunity for students to practice their expository reading and writing skills. Best of all, students end up with some their own innovation as they put together their own hand out to explain a game.

Should LeBron James Mow His Own Lawn? –  Discover this lesson that explroes absolute advantage, comparative advantage, specialization and trade with an example using professional basketball player LeBron James.

Using NBA Statistics for Box and Whiskers Plot – You may wish to substitute a student’s favorite NCAA player for the NBA player.  This lesson from Illuminations requires students to use information from basketball statistics to make and compare box and whisker plots. The data provided in the lesson come from the NBA, but you could apply the lesson to data from the NCAA men’s or women’s.

So there is my story and links… want the next 15 links? Please follow and sign up. I have them scheduled to be published before the end of this week. If this has been usefull please give a retweet! It mean a lot!

Thanks for joining me in my tribute to education and the need to include student voice, choice and relevance to learning. In the coming weeks you will discover posts devoted to 21st century education including such topics as Flipped Classrooms, Project Based Learning, Assessing 21st century skills, technology integration, web resources, and digital literacy.  I enjoy learning from all of you. Also, remember to subscribe to this 21centuryedtech  Blog by RSS or email and follow me on twitter at mjgormans. I also appreciate your sharing of this post and any retweets.  I hope you enjoy your journey of  best lessons never taught.  Have a great week! – Mike Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Booking Info - Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Those 2014 dates are going fast.

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15 Amazing Web Tools Facilitating Pre-Search Strategies… Digital Literacy Series Part 2

dl2

Welcome to a series that examines the process of research. These first two  posts include information and resources on that important pre-search process. In this series you are sure to find something that will fit any classroom  First, to ensure you do not miss one of these valuable posts or other resources covering PBL, Digital Curriculum, Web 2.0, STEM, 21st century learning, and technology integration, please sign up for 21centuryedtech by email or RSS.  As always,  I invite you to follow me on twitter (@mjgormans). Please give this post a retweet and pass it on. Have a great week – Michael Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Booking Info – Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Please contact me soon if you have an interest. It is not to early to think about planning PD for the next school year …. dates are  already beginning to fill!

15 Amazing Web Tools Facilitating Pre-Search Strategies… Digital Literacy Series Pt 2 – Michael Gorman    (http://21centuryedtech.wordpress.com/)

Last time we reflected on the idea of the internet being an amazing place filled with a wealth of information. I addressed what I feel are ten important pre-search strategies when beginning research with students.  You can read about these strategies in the prior post. In this post, I wish to build on  the steps outlined earlier. I would like to introduce some tools that can be used to help facilitate the pre-search period of time with students. By understanding the need for pre-search one can see how these tools, some of which you may already know, can be used in a different way to help students as they get ready to research.  Please enjoy the tools and let me know of other that I can include in a future post.

1. Visuwords™ online graphical dictionary —An amazing web tool allowing students to  look up words to find their meanings and associations with other words and concepts. Students will learn how words associate and will come up with new possible search terms. It is easy to enter words into the search box. Students can than look them up or double-click a node to expand the tree. When the mouse hovers over a node, one can see the definition. You can even click and drag individual nodes to move them around to help clarify connections.  Note from developer: “Visuwords™ uses Princeton University’s WordNet, an opensource database built by University students and language researchers. Combined with a visualization tool and user interface built from a combination of modern web technologies, Visuwords™ is available as a free resource to all patrons of the web.”

  • It’s a dictionary! It’s a thesaurus!
  • Great for writers, journalists, students, teachers, and artists.
  • The online dictionary is available wherever there’s an internet connection.
  • No membership required

2. Wikipedia - As you may know, this is a multilingual, web-based, free-content encyclopedia project operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. The name “Wikipedia” is a portmanteau of the words wiki (a technology for creating collaborative websites, from the Hawaiian word wiki, meaning “quick”) and encyclopedia. Of course, Wikipedia is not the only source of research, and as in all sources should be confirmed with other resources. Wikipedia can be a great place to start because:

  • Wikipedia’s articles provide links to guide the user to related pages with additional information. These links can be powerful at providing insight into the search and possible information.
  • There are words in a Wikipedia article can be recorded as possible keywords for a future search. As students record these  words they may also wish to figure out meanings with a simple Google (define:) search.
  • Wikipedia can give some beginning information that can help define and set the pathway for research
  • The Wikipedia end of article sources can be invaluable in the research and search process.

 3. Wordle - This website   allows for the generation of “word clouds” from text that is provided to it. These clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text that was input. Students can tweak these word clouds with different fonts, layouts, and color schemes. One pre-search strategy would involve placing an article on a topic into Wordle… perhaps from Wikipedia. Once the common words are eliminated the word cloud is made. This is now a great time to discuss and investigate words that are more prominent. Could these words be valuable in the research that will take place?

4. AnswerGarden - This site is best described as a minimalist feedback tool that is easy to use in the classroom. A teacher can create an Answer Garden by entering a topic on the Create New Answer Garden-Page. From there you will be redirected to your newly created Answer Garden Website. Since no-one has posted an answer yet, your Answer Garden will still be empty. The next step is to share your Answer Garden URL. Use it live in the classroom, to pose a question, or place (embed) your Answer Garden on your classroom website. A Driving Question could be posted with a request that students post their Need to Knows. There are countless possibilities. All student feedback  is than represented in your Answer Garden. One neat feature is to be able to export the feedback into a Word Cloud using Wordle or Tagxedo! Imagine the possible reflection and discussion that can spark great research.

5. Text 2 Mindmap -This website allows for a wonderful way to organize thoughts before performing a search. In order to encourage the use of mind mapping, Text 2 Mind Map has provided a free and simple mind mapping tool online.  The easiest way to learn Text2MindMap is to play with it and you will see that your students understand it fast.  Some tips:

Write some text in the text area, use the TAB key to indent text lines, and click the “Draw Mind Map”-button to see what happens. Each text line in the text area will become a separate node in the mind map. Indenting the text (using the TAB key) starts a new branch of nodes in the mind map. Also, have a look at the Options to style your mind map.

How might your students mind map their pre-search strategies? This is a wonderful way to get students to see the pre-search and research process and all of the possible connections. It could be a part of their blue print for that eventual encounter with the search engine.

6. Diffen - A very interesting tooll that lets the user compare anything. What is the difference between DVD+R and DVD-R? What is the difference between an apple and an orange, or  an alligator and a crocodile?  How does the work environment at IBM compare with working at Microsoft? How does living in Seattle compare with living in Amsterdam? What is the difference between a Plasma TV and an LCD TV? How about Cal Tech and UCLA or the Yankees and the Red Sox? These comparisons might clarify some Need To Know question and also provide words that will be valuable in the research process.

7. Thesaurus - Every month more than 50 million users across the globe visit this online English dictionary and thesaurus. That makes it the world’s largest and most authoritative free online dictionary and mobile reference resource.  A thesauruses is invaluable at finding words that might just lend themselves to the research process. It can open up a whole new line up of search word terms.

8. Wordsift - This is a wonderful tool for classroom use. Students can  enter a word into the WordSift “box” and a semantic map appears with different synonyms for the word. It is great for those looking to find research keyword possibilities. When a user hovers over the word, or its synonyms, a  definition is produced. Clicking on a synonym brings up a semantic map for that specific word. Each word is accompanied by Google images that illustrate different aspects of the word. Another great way to get students brainstorming and thinking about research possibilities.  A user can link from a word on the list to the same WordSift features.  With  just one click on a word in the list, students will get the same features, as if they had entered it into WordSift.

9. InstaGrok - This tool allows students to research a topic with an interactive map. They can customize it with facts, links, and videos. It is also possible for them to share it to show what they have learned. A wonderful way to journal the research process.

10. Interactive Webbing Tool - Students can use this  interactive from Read-Write-Think to create free-form graphic organizers,. They can drag  ideas around in the organizer to arrange any layout and relationship that they want. They can use circle or box (rectangle) shapes to appear on the chart and each layer on the chart will have a different color border for the shapes chosen. Imagine how this can be used to show the path and process in research.

11. Fishbone Diagram - This incredible digital tool from Classtools allows students to breakdown their  per-search ideas and thoughts while providing details and definitions. A Fishbone Diagram has always been a wonderful graphic organizer on paper, and now it can be part of your digital toolkit.

12. Google Image Search - It has often been said that a picture paints a thousand words. Your students can locate images and brainstorm possible search terms that these image provide. Not only will this be powerful as students begin to get ready to search, it is also a wonderful meta-cognitive activity

13. Dictionary - Not much explanation is needed as to why the dictionary can be an important tool in the pre-search time period. Perhaps students need to look up a word in order to understand a question, or an answer. This is just one example of many dictionaries online.

14. Google Drive (Docs) – The ability to collaborate together in the brainstorming portion of the pre-search strategy can be amplified by the ability to share digital documents. Your students can share documents, and also use Google’s drawing tools to collaborate, record, and journal their research journey.

15. K-W-L Creator –  Discover another great digital tool from Read-Write-Think. K-W-L charts have been widely used to help students prepare for research by organizing what students know (K) and want to learn (W) before they research, and then reflecting on what they learned (L). This helpful interactive tool is equipped with the work-saver functionality so that students can save their work at different stages in the K-W-L process. Users also have the ability to embed text links, giving an extra level of interaction and explanation.

As stated in the last post, it is essential to block out time for pre-search.  After all pre-search is the process of learning how to ask good questions, discovering  with answers. and coming up with more questions. It includes the act of  defining the question while building an understanding of important word meanings.  I do hope that some of these tools will help you and your students discover amazing ways to make use of the incredible resources on the internet. Using these tools to facilitate those pre-search skills will allow your  students to become masters of 21st century learning, a concept that will be so important to their future of challenging and exciting problems. Through out the coming posts, along with other educational topics, I will continue this exploration as we go from pre-search to research. Please join me, sign up today… and enjoy these tools!

Thanks for joining me on this wonderful journey of 21st century resources.  Join me in future weeks as together we continue to explore several more posts devoted to the Flipped Classrooms, Project Based Learning, Assessing 21st century skills, technology integration, web resources, and digital literacy.  I enjoy learning from all of you. Also remember to subscribe to this blog by RSS or email and follow me on twitter at mjgormans.  I also appreciate your sharing of this post and any retweets. Keep  up the amazing work,  have a great week, and enjoy the resources! – Mike Gorman

Booking Info - Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Those 2014 dates are going fast.

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Writing Adviser – Free Literacy Tool for Formative Writing Assessment

sp_writing_reviser

Welcome to a new series of short posts. These posts will be short, timely, and will come between my weekly longer in-depth posts.  Please sign up for 21centuryedtech by email or RSS to follow all engaging posts and follow me on twitter (@mjgormans). Share post with others with  a retweet . Last,  check out how I can provide PD at your school or conference at my booking information page . Spring and Summer are just about full and I am taking Back to School dates now… send email at (mjgormans@gmail.com)!  Until the next post… enjoy!  – Michael Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Free Writing Reviser from SAS Curriculum Pathways

Writing Reviser – Check out this free writing adviser that students can use to get instant feedback on their writing. Students can type in the tool itself or upload a document. Awesome formative tool. Students are  allowed  to focus on their purpose and audience, essay structure, and use of written language (sentence economy, variety, power, and clarity). You will see your students learning to ask questions experienced writers ask automatically. As a result, you’ll see your students express themselves with greater precision and power. Best of all it is free. You will need an account set up to use this amazing tool, and then you can also enroll your students. As always check your AUP and Terms of Use. I was amazed at the results that it gave me in my own writing. SAS Curriculum Pathways has hundreds of other resources you may wish to explore… this tool is a great start!

Next Post: 15 Amazing Free  Pre-Search Tools to Teach Digital Literacy and Research

Thank you for joining me on my new short posts and please know that my in-depth posts will  still be coming your way.  Again your retweets, follows on twitter at @mjgormans, and subscriptions (which are free) are appreciated !  - Mike (mjgormans@gmail.com)

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10 Steps For Pre-Search Strategies… Digital Literacy Series Part 1

dlseries1

Welcome to a series that examines the process of research. The first few posts will include that important pre-search process. In this series you are sure to find something that will fit any classroom  First, to ensure you do not miss one of these valuable posts or other resources covering PBL, Digital Curriculum, Web 2.0, STEM, 21st century learning, and technology integration, please sign up for 21centuryedtech by email or RSS.  As always,  I invite you to follow me on twitter (@mjgormans). Please give this post a retweet and pass it on. Have a great week – Michael Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Booking Info – Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Please contact me soon if you have an interest. My winter, spring, and summer for 2014 PD dates  are already beginning to fill fast! 

10 Steps For Pre-Search Strategies… Digital Literacy Series Part 1 – Michael Gorman (http://21centuryedtech.wordpress.com/)

The internet is an amazing place filled with a wealth of information.  In fact, there is so much information, students must be given the skills on how to search and evaluate in order to utilize the amazing treasures that can be found in an ever running faucet of information.   While skilled researchers have developed meta-cognitive skills in order  to prepare for their encounter with their favorite search engine, this is not always the case of students in the classroom. This article does not involve my lessons of facilitating the search using the Google Advance Search,  or my A-G method for evaluating websites..watch for updates on these posts in the future.  Instead, I wish to discuss the strategies that are important to research before a student enters that first key word in the research portion. The next post in this series will introduce you to 15 valuable tools you can use to facilitate the pre-search.

1. Design the Question – As a teacher it is important to understand the purpose of the research activity. This helps in designing the research question that is to be used. Is it a question with a definite answer …or is it one that is open ended? There is a big difference between the two as students are facilitated through the process. A simple research question (What elements make up water?) may be easily answered through a search engine. In this case, there may be minimal time spent on pre-search, with an emphasis  more on web page evaluation and search strategies. On the other hand, it may be the question is more open ended… (Is there enough safe drinking water in the world?). In this case there may be a need for pre-search strategies , although even simple questions can also be served by some pre-search activities.

2. Emphasize The Need To Know – To begin we must understand that research really does involve student inquiry. Perhaps before answering a question… we ask students to ask more questions.  Often this is called the “Need To Know”.  A good open ended question that drives research does not always have a clear and precise answer. In other words, it may not be Google-able. Instead students might ask “Need To Know” questions that can be answered in a simple search. It may also lead to more questions, allowing for divergent learning. Teaching students to first ask great questions might be more important then starting the task by finding answers. Even in a simple question, (What elements make up water?), students may have to answer the question (What is an element?). This emphasizes the related topic below.

3. Clarifying the Question –  Often students do not even understand the question being asked. In this case the question needs to be simplified. There may also be a discussion needed allowing students to clarify the question. This may involve the ” Need to Know” described above. It may also necessitate that students break down the question and get definitions to words being used in the question. This might facilitate the need for students to find synonyms, antonyms, and associations… before diving into the search. It could involve a mini search, where definitions are found for word meaning. In this manner students find success at researching manageable tasks. This can be especially powerful when students are allowed to collaborate together seeking the answers.

4. Creating Student Journals – Educators must encourage students to keep a road map of their pre-search journey. It might include words, definitions, reflections, and  “Need To Know” questions, This can be done using a reflective journal.  One might ask students to write entries to reflect on their research journey activity. The teacher might develop a rubric that uses components of critical thinking. These components of critical thinking can be discussion prompts in the student journal.

5. Defining the learning goal/target – Please remember that research is a process. While the end goal is to try to find an answer, remind students they may run into more questions first. It is only through though this process that real learning takes place. The focus must be on the process and not the answer. This has its formation in the pre-search time period. If there is no pre-search time given… possibly the end product has become more important then the process.

6. Defining the answer – There may even be times when there is no answer, and students must formulate and must create their own answer. This can be discussed in  this important pre-search process and students may need to determine which type of question they may have. In this way, students learn that the internet does not always have the answer.  It also allows students the the powerful process of  creating their own new knowledge, which in turn allows for better understanding.

7. Allowing for Formative Assessment – It is important to use formative assessment techniques in order to assess students while allowing for future instruction.   Include  pre-search learning activities, look for feedback, devise rubrics, celebrate success, and be ready to provide guidance in any set backs. This might include a exit slip that asks for student understanding of an important word, which must be understood in order to find success in the next phase of the process.The next post in the series will include tools for possible activities.

8. Encourage collaboration –  Encourage collaboration during these the pre-search phase, and later. Working with others will help build confidence and can also assist in developing understanding. A collaborative and engaged group can often promote rigor by challenging and questioning each other.

9. Utilize Internet Tools –  There are numerous internet tools that can help students and teachers through out the pre-search process. They are engaging while also promoting the important meta-cognition needed to really look for and create answers while researching.  The next post in this series will contain about fifteen possibilities … one good reason to subscribe now!

10. Create awareness beyond the search engine – Many times students not only fail to practice any pre-search strategies, but they go instantly to Google. They must see that it is important to understand the question before prompting a search in a search engine. Discussions on different ways to find answers can also be part of the pre-search. What subscription data bases do they have access to, what might be in the library, are there are other search engines, are there non-traditional research sources such as interviews, museums, transcripts, the hidden internet, or other possibilities? Examining this concept could make the research time more productive.

In conclusion, it is essential to block out time for pre-search.  After all pre-search is the process of learning how to ask good questions, discovering  with answers. and coming up with more questions. It includes the act of  defining the question while building an understanding of important word meanings. It allows for formative learning, while also incorporating the power of collaboration to explore and understand. Also of importance is understanding there could be many ways to answer a question, and some questions might not be answered. Most importantly, some of those answers may be their own student creation from information they have learned along the way. As these skills are emphasized, students will become masters of 21st century learning, a concept that will be so important to their future of challenging and exciting problems. Please join me in my next series post where I examine 15 powerful web tools to facilitate the important process of pre-searching.

Thanks for joining me on this wonderful journey of 21st century resources.  Join me in future weeks as together we continue to explore several more posts devoted to the Flipped Classrooms, Digital Literacy, Project Based Learning, Assessing 21st century skills, technology integration, web resources, and digital literacy.  I enjoy learning from all of you. Also remember to subscribe to this blog by RSS or email and follow me on twitter at mjgormans.  I also appreciate your sharing of this post and any retweets. Interested in having me visit your school , organization, or conference… check my booking information… 2014 is filling fast! Keep  up the amazing work,  have a great week, and enjoy the resources! – Mike Gorman

Booking Info - Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Those 2014 dates are going fast.

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Free Webinar: Online Learning and UDL…Plus Online Learning Award: Winner Attends ISTE

sigol post
Welcome to a new series of short posts. These posts will be short, timely, and will come between my weekly longer in-depth posts.  Please sign up for 21centuryedtech by email or RSS to follow all engaging posts and follow me on twitter (@mjgormans). Share post with others with  a retweet . Last,  check out how I can provide PD at your school or conference at my booking information page . Until the next post… enjoy!  – Michael Gorman (21centuryedtech)

You may not be aware that I am currently the president for ISTE’s SIGOL (Special Interest Group for Online Learning). For this reason I want to share with you some amazing opportunities that SIGOL is offering in the next week. First, Mindy Johnson from CAST will be providing a webinar on UDL (Universal Design For Learning). She has promised it will have a wonderful online twist. This is a must attend webinar for anyone considering the digital or e-curriculum.

It is also the last week to enter a competition for ISTE SIGOL Online Learning Award. If you have been part of an awesome online/blended learning experience or project this year… take a moment to enter! It will not only give the winner  some amazing recognition… it will pay for ISTE Membership, conference registration, and give a $1000 travel allowance!

Last, if you are interested in online or blended learning feel free to contact me. We are not only looking for new members of the SIG, but also educators to be part of our leadership team. Memebership is included with ISTE. Please take a look at the opportunities below… and give it a retweet!

SIGOL FREE Webinar: Introduction to Universal Design for Learning with an Online Learning Twist! 
Thursday, February 27, 7:00pm ET
Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is popping up everywhere — in district and state initiatives, in the National Educational Technology Plan, in the Higher Education Act, in the latest educational tools and apps, and at ISTE.  But what is UDL?  What does UDL have to do with online learning?  How can using the UDL framework address the learner variability we encounter daily?  Join Mindy Johnson from CAST on Thursday, February 27th at 7:00pm ET to learn the basics of UDL and discover why it’s one of the most important frameworks in education today.
 
SIGOL Online Learning Award
Deadline for Submissions: Friday, February 28

The SIGOL Online Learning Award is a fantastic opportunity to show off creative online learning opportunities that you and/or your colleagues have planned, implemented, and evaluated.  Prizes include complimentary registration to the ISTE Conference and Expo (up to two), up to $1000 in travel expenses for attending the conference (up to two), and some great recognition at ISTE and in ISTE publications. Don’t miss this fantastic opportunity!  Nominate yourself or a colleague by Friday, February 28th.
For more information, including nomination forms: http://goo.gl/G9qtZ0

Thank you for joining me on my new short posts and please know that my in-depth posts will  still be coming your way.  Again your retweets, follows on twitter at @mjgormans, and subscriptions (which are free) are appreciated !  - Mike (mjgormans@gmail.com)
 

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STEM Education: Over 25 STEAM Links Filled With Resources and Information

steam 

Welcome to a post devoted to turning STEM to STEAM. It is exciting to cover the topic of STEAM since it is important to include the Arts.  I have also included 25 resources to help make it happen! Don’t miss any  posts.You are sure to find something that will fit your classroom in the very near future.  First, to ensure you do not miss one of these valuable posts or other resources covering PBL, Digital Curriculum, Web 2.0, STEM, 21st century learning, and technology integration, please sign up for 21centuryedtech by email or RSS.  As always,  I invite you to follow me on twitter (@mjgormans). Please give this post a retweet and pass it on. Have a great week – Michael Gorman (21centuryedtech)

Booking Info – Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Please contact me soon if you have an interest. My winter, spring, and summer for 2014 PD dates  are already beginning to fill fast! 

It actually is quite obvious that the Arts should be included in STEM education. A look at the works of Leonardo da Vinci will attest to this! The very first time I heard the idea of integrating the Arts into STEM education was while watching a keynote made by Daniel Pink at the NECC  Conference in Washington DC… yes prior to ISTE Conferences!  Pink presented strong evidence that educators must include right brain lessons in addition to the inclusion of historical left brain activities. A reading of his book, A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule The Future, is a must for any educator, especially those interested in STEM education. It is evident that inserting the A (Arts) in STEM and creating STEAM allows for true innovation, and it is innovation that will allow students to be successful in a flat world. Bringing the Arts to STEM allows students to remember the creative juices that come with the smell of a Crayola Crayon, the engagement of Tinker Toys, and the creation and remixing of that first Easy Bake Oven. It is the STEAM that allows students to not just be technology consumers, but technology creators! Proper infusion of the Arts will create a STEAM culture that engages and promotes intrinsic learning. In the space below I have included some sites that may just allow educators to integrate the Arts, allowing STEM to become STEAM! While there is a lot of talk on STEAM Education, it is difficult to find a lot of material. I hope you enjoy what I have gathered and please let me know what I should include in an up-date post.

NPR Where Science Meets Art - Some exceptional Podcasts integrating Science and Art. Many of these titles will allow for student reflection and questions as they begin to see how the Arts and Science can be integrated.

Arts Edge - A fantastic resource from the Kennedy Center hosting numerous lessons that integrate Art in the curriculum.You will discover a focus  on ways to support innovative teaching with the arts, and meet changing trends in education and to accommodate the ever-evolving impact of technology in our lives. This amazing collection of free digital resources—including lesson plans, audio stories, video clips, and interactive online modules—has been streamlined for easier browsing and upgraded to leverage best practices in educational media and multimedia-supported

How to Smile -  Discover this group of science museums dedicated to bringing science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) out of the academic cloister and into the wider world. Find new ways to teach kids about math and science.  Discover activities that meet you where you live, whether your “classroom” is an active volcano, the shark tank at the local aquarium, or your own kitchen table. SMILE is collecting the best educational materials on the web and creating learning activities, tools, and services.

Discover Engineering – Innovation is important and must be part of any STEM curriculum. At this site you will discover a video that showcases the art of engineering? You may find a  hands-on activity that covers some amazing STEM content.? There is a large database of sort-able ideas for you to engineer in your classroom.

PBS Learning Makers Party – Thus initiative encourages people around the world meet up, learn to make things, and share what they’ve made online. This wonderful collection is designed to support the Maker Party by providing a one-stop shop of STEM and digital making resources that focus on the problem, technology, or process behind object creation.

STEM to STEAM -The STEM to STEAM initiative, championed by the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), is supported by teachers, researchers, policy makers, students, and business people from RISD and beyond.

DIY  –A great way for kids to get skills, innovate, and meet others who share the same passions Kids can make their  own portfolio where they share what they make and do. They also earn embroidered skill patches for completing sets of challenges. Educators may wish to consider starting a DIY Club or DIY Classroom.

Makey Makey – OK… it is not free, but it is very inexpensive. Students can let their imagination run wild as they construct new games and even possible put together a band where their instruments are fruit.

Why Scientific Innovation Needs The Arts – Explore this wonderful article from the Guardian that explains the connection of science and the arts. Great read to support STEAM thinking in any educational setting.

OER Commons – Take a look at these results from a search I did for  STEAM based activities. There are some powerful lessons that bring the arts into the classroom. Since it is OER (Open Education Resources) it is free.

Odyessey of the Mind – This  international educational program provides creative problem-solving opportunities for students from kindergarten through college. Team members apply their creativity to solve problems.

Autodesk Digital Steam Workshop - Digital STEAM projects are designed by Autodesk’s network of expert educators, designers and student alumni as exciting complements to core Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, and Art (STEAM) curriculum. Each project aligns with common core and national standards, and delivers measurable learning while using free software.

PBS Design Squad Nation – Turn the innovation on in your classroom.  Use Design Squad Nation activities, animations, video profiles, and episodes in classrooms and after-school programs, in libraries and museums, at events and at home. This will engage your students in some amazing activities.

National Gallery of Art  - You will find organized into thematic units, each grade-level-specific lesson plan focuses on a single work of art and can be executed within one to two class periods. These lessons meet the National Art Education Association (NAEA) Visual Arts curriculum standards

Exploratorium - Take a look at the entire site, but especially explore the Art related material. You will find lessons that allow you to connect with other subject areas including the STEM disciplines. You will get a new definition of exploring through the Exploratorium,

The Art Institute of Chicago – Explore these wonderful lessons that cover Science and the Arts. It just might have you and your students look at Art in a whole different way. Best of all you will discover some STEAM possibilities.

Lesson Plans and resources for Art Integration – This Edutopia Article has a rich assortment of lessons and resources to integrate Art into curricular areas including Math, Science, and Design. A great read that will lead to some wonderful opportunities.

CIESE Online - CIESE  (Center for Innovation and Science Education) sponsors and designs interdisciplinary projects that teachers throughout the world can use to enhance their curriculum through compelling use of the Internet.  Each project has a brief description and links to the National Science Standards and NCTM math standards it supports

Masterpieces to Math – A wonderful article that focuses on how to incorporate art in math. Learn how to use Art to teach fractions, decimals, and percent equivalents. You will look at Math in a whole new STEAMie way.

Space School Musical – Your students will enjoy joining teenager Hannah on a trip through the solar system in this ultra-cool edu-tainment “hip-hopera” that uses song and dance to introduce the planets, moons, asteroids and more. Educators can download the lyrics for students to learn and perform the routines for themselves or just play the videos in class. There are also links for more in-depth activities.

Cardboard Challenge – Not everything needs high tech and expensive resources. A lot can be done with a cardboard box and a lot of imagination. Check out this amazing challenge from the Imagine Foundation. Take a moment to watch the video. You and your students will want to be involved with this amazing low tech, high engagement possibility.

KinderArt – Discover Fine Art lessons as they apply to all different subject areas. Lessons are searchable by grade and subject. Some great ideas to integrate with.

ArtSTEM – Claims to be a site where the Arts and Humanities meet the STEM Disciplines. Wonderful collection of blog posts that contain both writing and multimedia to display the Art in Science.

Scratch –  With Scratch, kids can program their own interactive stories, games, and animations — and share your creations with others in the online community. Scratch helps young people learn to think creatively, reason systematically, and work collaboratively . All of this is possible while essential skills for life in the 21st century are facilitated.. Scratch is a project of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab. It is provided free of charge.

Teacher Vision Art and Math –Students will enjoy participating in math class with our art activities for teachers of any grade level, from elementary to high school.  You will find opportunities to mix numbers with creativity and art activities that your students will love. There are lessons for creating counting books, crafts that encourage measuring, geometry printables to color, sculpting activities, and much more!  Introduce new concepts or reinforce topics your students have already learned.

Thanks for joining me on this wonderful journey of 21st century resources.  Join me in future weeks as together we continue to explore several more posts devoted to the Flipped Classrooms, Project Based Learning, Assessing 21st century skills, technology integration, web resources, and digital literacy.  I enjoy learning from all of you. Also remember to subscribe to this blog by RSS or email and follow me on twitter at mjgormans.  I also appreciate your sharing of this post and any retweets. Keep  up the amazing work,  have a great week, and enjoy the resources! – Mike Gorman

Booking Info - Are you looking for a practical and affordable professional development workshop for your school or conference?  I have traveled the country delivering PD relating to technology integration, PBL, STEM, Digital Literacy, and the 4 C’s. I have done 100′s of workshops and presentations.  Check out my Booking Page… Those 2014 dates are going fast. 

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